In Which: Writing Is And Isn’t Work : Rant List #1

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Random Writer Rants #1

  1. No matter how much I write everyone always thinks it’s ‘just a hobby’.

1.1.These remarks always seem to happen when I’m working my hardest and getting more done than ever, leading to my being needlessly grumpy.

2. Somehow it is entirely possible to write most of a story in what I think is breathtaking detail only to find that I never actually told the reader important exposition that the whole plot doesn’t work without .

3. Writing five pages always feels longer than reading five pages….

4. Except when that five pages is one of the ‘fun parts’ I have been looking forward to writing.

5. …Yes I know, if I am a ‘real writer’ every part should be the fun part. But I’ve come to find out as much as many books on how to write say that every part of writing should be a joy, the day to day reality of it is that sometimes it *gasp* actually feels like the work it is, and that’s okay. That doesn’t mean I love it any less.

6. Sometimes I can put blood sweat and tears into a story and it doesn’t show on the words on the page…Or, maybe it is there and my own writing isn’t to my own reading taste? Wouldn’t that be ironic. Oh well, back to work…

In Which: Young Adult is Still Adult

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While on one of my journeys across the internet for info into the inner workings of writing young adult fiction (which somehow ends just as often in Facebook as it does in my opening a FocusWriter document) I came across a few interesting articles. The common consensus these days seems to be if you are over 18, or worst yet, the dreaded 30,  and ‘still’ read YA novels, you should have your ‘I am a sensible adult wise in the ways of the world having no happy endings’ licence revoked. Or, on the other end, that not liking YA novels as an adult makes you a member of the ‘Bitter, old, dusty literary book lovers and puppy kickers’ club.

I’m not sure if either side is totally right or wrong. As I get older though I actually feel like I enjoy young adult and even *gasp* children’s books more  than I even did when I was their target age group. Part of that isn’t because I somehow grew up without learning how unrealistic these stories are, but really, because I did. The same goes for the other worlds in classic scifi or the happily ever afters in a good romance novel. Of course love doesn’t last forever, of course the hero doesn’t always get rid of a government that is corrupt and killing people. But for the short space of a novel or a series it does an adult heart good to believe in that impossible thing. Maybe, so if someday we get even a small bit of that impossible in our real life we will still be able to recognize it , and turn the page to something wonderful.

In Which: There is A Blue Screen Of Not Death

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I love Wordperfect. There, I said it.

I didn’t always love it, no.  It was the first real program to introduce me to typing on a blank screen and filling it up, and given my horrible dyslexia at the time (which has lessened with age, oddly) that wasn’t a good thing in my eyes.

But what drove me crazy was the formatting. Or, I should say, lack there of.¶  (Sometimes this mark was a simple box shape)

I knew the formatting was actually there, but being able to see it all the time drove my little perfectionist mind crazy.¶

It was the one time where I felt happier in Word. Until, of course,the pages were printed out and the symbols were gone like a figment of my too active imagination.

But something about that blue screen stayed with me. Deep inside, it spoke of some nostalgic ghost of hours and hours of non-stop fiction typing creativity.

I’ve since found FocusWriter and a theme that brings back all these feelings full force.

Even if I can’t make the real dusty program run on my shiny PC, this seems like the next best thing.

Hello, old blue friend.